Oceanography The Official Magazine of
The Oceanography Society
Volume 07 Issue 01

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Volume 07, No. 1
Pages 29 - 30

OpenAccess

Oceanography—The Next 50 Years

John A. Knauss | Scripps institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, and University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, USA

First Paragraph

In preparation for this talk I spent some time reviewing the past. What has happened in the last 50 years and why? I also asked myself the question: should a reasonably astute young man coming into the field at the end of World War II (as I did) have been able to predict what we see around us today? I believe he might have got some of it right but he would have missed a lot and the difference, I believe, is illuminating. Many of the fundamental questions are the same now as then. How old is the deep water? What controls species-species interaction? What are the processes that control energy and particle transfer at the ocean-atmosphere interface? How does one interpret the climatic and geological history of the earth from deep sea cores?

Citation

Knauss, J.A. 1994. Oceanography—The next 50 years. Oceanography 7(1):29–30, https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.1994.15.

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