Oceanography The Official Magazine of
The Oceanography Society
Volume 26 Issue 01

View Issue TOC
Volume 26, No. 1
Pages 18 - 23

OpenAccess

RIPPLE MARKS • The Forgotten Forests: Mangroves' Future Hangs in the Balance Between Land and Sea | Plug Your Power Cord Into the Seafloor? Seabed Bacteria Function as Live Electric Cables | Living Light on the Deep-Sea Floor: Bioluminescence Also Shines in the Benthos

Cheryl Lyn Dybas
First Paragraph

The Forgotten Forests: Mangroves' Future Hangs in the Balance Between Land and Sea

The mangal, it's called, this tangle of roots that makes up the mangrove forest biome. There, trees with twisted limbs live in two worlds—one foot on land, the other in the sea.

Mangals thrive in saline coastal sediment habitats in the tropics and subtropics. Neither solely of land nor of sea, these forests of the tide cover an area of 150,000 km2 in 123 nations and territories—less than 1% of all tropical forests worldwide, and less than 0.4% of the total global forest "estate."

Plug Your Power Cord Into the Seafloor? Seabed Bacteria Function as Live Electric Cables

Man-made power cables crisscross the globe, but could nature have designed its own electrical cords—and hidden them at the bottom of the sea?

That's exactly what happened, according to researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark. They discovered natural electrical currents running through the mud on the seabed of Aarhus Bay. Electrons are transported from oxygen-free mud a few centimeters beneath the seafloor to oxygen-rich mud on the surface of the seabed.

Living Light on the Deep-Sea Floor: Bioluminescence Also Shines in the Benthos

Cable bacteria aren't the only unusual creatures at the bottom of the sea.

Sudden blue flashes. Shooting beams of red light. An eerie green glow. All are surreal displays put on by deep-sea animals that are bioluminescent.

Citation

Dybas, C.L. 2013. Ripple marks—The story behind the story. Oceanography 26(1):18–23, https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2013.13.

Copyright & Usage

This is an open access article made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format as long as users cite the materials appropriately, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate the changes that were made to the original content. Images, animations, videos, or other third-party material used in articles are included in the Creative Commons license unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If the material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission directly from the license holder to reproduce the material.