TOS Fellows Program

Recognizing Individuals Who Have Attained Eminence in Oceanography Through Their Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Oceanography or Its Applications During a Substantial Period of Years

MEET THE TOS FELLOWS

The Oceanography Society (TOS) congratulates Steven G. Ackleson, Paula S. Bontempi, Amatzia Genin, Robert A. Holman, Eric J. Lindstrom, Clare E. Reimers, and Roger M. Samelson for being selected Fellows of The Oceanography Society. The new TOS Fellows will be honored during a ceremony at the Ocean Sciences Meeting, February 16–20, 2020, in San Diego, California.

Steven G. Ackleson

For fundamental contributions to the understanding of phytoplankton optical properties, radiative transfer models and the development and application of autonomous ocean observing systems

Colleagues who nominated Dr. Ackleson for this honor noted his research in ocean optics and his leadership roles at the Office of Naval Research and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership that helped define a national strategy for ocean research, observation, and technology development. Additionally, they noted that many of the optical sensors commercially available to the community today are direct results of Steve’s focused efforts.

Dr. Ackleson received his M.S. in 1981 and his PhD. in 1985 from the College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware. He is an oceanographer with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) where he maintains an active research program focused on land-sea interactions and biodiversity in shallow coastal environments using remote sensing and in situ autonomous systems.

Paula S. Bontempi

For her vision of what satellite-based ocean ecology could be, and tireless efforts to bring that vision to fruition in partnership with the community and space agencies

 

The colleagues who submitted her nomination described Dr. Bontempi’s profound impact on ocean ecology and carbon science, beginning with her vision in bringing the community together to create a long-term strategy for the NASA Ocean Biology and Biochemistry program, and continuing with her advocacy and implementation of crucial satellite and sea-going projects which has supported significant research accomplishments. Additionally, the nomination team recognized her dedication to the upcoming generation of scientists through mentoring efforts, support for the NASA Graduate Fellowship Program, and funding for students to attend training courses and scientific conferences.

Dr. Bontempi received her M.S. in oceanography in 1995 from Texas A&M University and received her PhD. in oceanography in 2001 from the University of Rhode Island. She is the program manager for Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry in the NASA Science Mission Directorate’s Earth Science Division (ESD) and serves as the program scientist on MODIS, Suomi NPP, PACE, NAAMES, CORAL, and Carbon Cycle Science. She is also currently serving as ESD Acting Deputy Director.

Amatzia Genin

For original and sustained contributions to biological oceanography, through creative and comprehensive studies testing core hypotheses related to bio-physical interactions and the functioning of marine ecosystems

The colleagues who submitted his nomination described Dr. Genin’s contributions to the field, building on the significant studies he conducted concerning the effects of seamounts on biological processes as a graduate student, and continuing to this day as a leading expert on the coral reef ecology and oceanography of the Gulf of Aqaba and adjoining Red Sea. The nominators also recognized that Dr. Genin has been a master of mechanistic studies, an outstanding mentor, a generous colleague, and an ambassador of marine science.

Dr. Genin received his M.S. in environmental biology in 1981 from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and received his PhD. in biological oceanography in 1987 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. He served as the Scientific Director of the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences of Eilat, Israel from 2012 to 2018.

Robert A. Holman

For pioneering work on the development of remote sensing tools and advancing the understanding of the world’s evolving coastlines

 

The colleagues who submitted his nomination described Dr. Holman’s gift for recognizing the potential of new technologies, then developing methods to produce data sets that provide information about beach evolution. The nominating team also recognized his sustained leadership to enable the nearshore community to collectively make progress on these important questions related to nearshore oceanography and coastal engineering.

Dr. Holman received his PhD. in physical oceanography in 1979 from Dalhousie University. He currently is Professor Emeritus at the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University.

Eric J. Lindstrom

For leadership of the global community to advance coordinated ocean observing combining space and in-situ systems and facilitating the execution of large ocean field campaigns

The colleagues who submitted his nomination described Dr. Lindstrom as having impressive scientific insight and accomplishments, which combined with his skillful management style, benefits our entire community. Eric’s vision is proving to be instrumental in organizing international collaborations to delve into the workings of the ocean and its place in the global climate system. He is highly respected internationally in the field of ocean observations, satellite or in situ. His support of satellite-based sensing of the sea surface salinity mission made such an ‘impossible dream’ a reality. The nominating team also noted his ongoing efforts to foster the development of early career scientists, including being a strong supporter and sponsor of the Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention (MPOWIR).

Dr. Lindstrom received his B.S. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1977, M.S. in physical oceanography in 1979 and his Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Washington, Seattle. He currently serves as the Program Scientist for Physical Oceanography in the Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC. At NASA he has been responsible for the science support on 16 satellite and suborbital missions over that last 22 years. He is the co-chair of the U.S. Interagency Ocean Observations Committee and recently served five years as co-chair of the international Global Ocean Observing System Steering Committee.

Clare E. Reimers

For advancing sedimentary redox chemistry and microbiology using oxygen, pH, and pCO2 microelectrodes and leading the development of the next generation of regional class research vessels

 

The colleagues, who submitted her nomination, particularly noted her groundbreaking research using oxygen, pH and pCO2 microelectrodes in situ to study sediment geochemistry and microbiology toward a better understanding of redox and carbon dynamics in sediments. They further noted that her work has led to significant new information about benthic fluxes within the global carbon cycle and to seafloor energy harvesting approaches using benthic microbial fuel cells. Together, the impacts of her work have profoundly changed our thinking in marine geology, chemistry and biology including microbiology. Additionally, the nominators noted her dedication to training the next generation of ocean scientists, including the UNOLS-chief scientist training cruises for early career scientists she organized.

Dr. Reimers received her M.S. in oceanography in 1978 and her Ph.D. in oceanography in 1982 from Oregon State University. She was named a Distinguished Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University in 2019 and serves as the Regional Class Research Vessel Project Scientist.

Roger M. Samelson

For seminal, wide-ranging contributions on the theory of physical dynamics of the ocean

 

The colleagues who submitted his nomination noted that Dr. Samelson has made exceptional scientific contributions on a remarkable range of topics, including chaotic exchange in meandering currents, large-scale ocean circulation, coastal upwelling, and marine meteorology. He shows outstanding skill in theory, sophisticated numerical modeling, and observations to establish the relevance of theoretical and modeling results to the ocean and atmosphere. While Dr. Samelson is without question one of the leading theoreticians in physical oceanography, his efforts to bridge the gap between theory and observation set him apart.

Dr. Samelson completed his M.S. in mathematics as well as his Ph.D. in physical oceanography in 1987 at Oregon State University. He is a Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University.

Steven G. Ackleson (2019)
For fundamental contributions to the understanding of phytoplankton optical properties, radiative transfer models and the development and application of autonomous ocean observing systems

D. James Baker (2017/2018)
For contributions in founding TOS and providing leadership to the nation’s ocean science and policy communities

Richard T. Barber (2013)
For sustained and fundamental contributions to the science, community service and mentorship of countless others in integrated ocean ecosystem science

Jack Barth (2012)
For contributions and sustained leadership in all aspects of continental shelf oceanography, and for his commitment to community service.

Paula S. Bontempi (2019)
For her vision of what satellite-based ocean ecology could be, and tireless efforts to bring that vision to fruition in partnership with the community and space agencies

Mark A. Cane (2014)
For contributions to the understanding and prediction of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the tropical oceans and their effects on climate and society

John J. Cullen (2005)
For fundamental contributions to our understanding of the influence of environmental conditions on phytoplankton function in the ocean

Margaret L. Delaney (2005)
For paleoceanographic research in nutrient and carbon cycling and service to the oceanographic and scientific ocean drilling communities

Ellen R.M. Druffel (2009)
For advancing the use of natural abundance radiocarbon measurements in marine carbon cycle research.

Robert A. Duce (2005)
For research on the global biogeochemistry of trace elements in the ocean/atmosphere system

Rana A. Fine (2015)
For significant contributions to the understanding of the ocean circulation and ventilation

Amatzia Genin (2019)
For original and sustained contributions to biological oceanography, through creative and comprehensive studies testing core hypotheses related to bio-physical interactions and the functioning of marine ecosystems

Charles H. Greene (2007)
For seminal contributions to the field of bioacoustics, innovation and excellence in teaching, and service to the oceanographic community

Arnold L. Gordon (2015)
For fundamental contributions to our understanding of how the global ocean is interconnected, drawing from his observations of the Southern Ocean, Indonesian Seas, and Agulhas retroflection

Robert A. Holman (2019)
For pioneering work on the development of remote sensing tools and advancing the understanding of the world’s evolving coastlines

Grant Ingram (2006)
For insightful studies of physical processes and physical/biological coupling in extreme polar regions and for untiring service to the oceanographic community

James R. Ledwell (2017/2018)
For seminal contributions to the understanding of oceanic mixing

Marlon Lewis (2009)
For seminal contributions advancing our knowledge of ocean optics, physical-biological interactions, and ecology

Eric J. Lindstrom (2019)
For leadership of the global community to advance coordinated ocean observing combining space and in-situ systems and facilitating the execution of large ocean field campaigns

Michael J. McPhaden (2005)
For ENSO research and unselfish service in providing the community with tropical atmosphere and ocean observations (TAO array)

James N. Moum (2017/2018)
For outstanding contributions to widely used observational techniques and understanding of ocean mixing over a broad range of processes and scales

Theresa Paluszkiewicz (2013)
For long-term vision and contributions in basic research, mentoring and outreach, and national and international program leadership

Mary Jane Perry (2009)
For contributions to the founding and advancement of the sub-discipline of bio-optical oceanography and the education of more than a generation of bio-optics students

Clare E. Reimers (2019)
For advancing sedimentary redox chemistry and microbiology using oxygen, pH, and pCO2 microelectrodes and leading the development of the next generation of regional class research vessels

Roger M. Samelson (2019)
For seminal, wide-ranging contributions on the theory of physical dynamics of the ocean

Mary W. Silver (2009)
For pioneering research on the ecology of marine organisms, excellence in teaching, mentoring and service to the oceanographic community

Heidi M. Sosik (2017/2018)
For outstanding contributions to phytoplankton ecology, sensor development and graduate and undergraduate ocean science education

P. Ted Strub (2013)
For advancing the understanding of eastern boundary current upwelling systems and leading interdisciplinary studies of these systems

Lynne D. Talley (2009)
For advancements in understanding the large scale circulation of the ocean and dedication to the oceanographic community

W. Stanley Wilson (2017/2018)
For his key role establishing NASA’s Oceanography from Space Program and organizing the international coalition in support of the Argo observing system

Charles S. Yentsch (2008)
For promoting oceanography through innovation, fundamental discoveries in bio-optics and phytoplankton production, and the visionary founding of enduring oceanographic programs

James A. Yoder (2011)
For innovative and visionary application of satellite ocean color technologies to interdisciplinary oceanography and his extraordinary service to oceanography

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